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image: Printing Ears

Printing Ears

By | September 1, 2013

Cornell University biomedical engineer Lawrence Bonassar 3-D prints ears using “ink” that contains living cells.

2 Comments

image: Printing Life

Printing Life

By | September 1, 2013

3-D printing allows tissue engineers to fabricate more-complex shapes and to precisely mix biological materials.

0 Comments

image: Remaking a Classic

Remaking a Classic

By | September 1, 2013

Companies are bursting at the seams with tools to engineer pharma’s next magic bullet: the new and improved antibody.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2013

September 2013's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: You Are <em>When</em> You Eat

You Are When You Eat

By | September 1, 2013

Circadian time zones and metabolism

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image: Making Meat

Making Meat

By | September 1, 2013

This animation explains the process researchers used to make a lab-grown hamburger patty, which was served up for the first time in early August, 2013.

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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

From therapeutics to gene transfer, bacteriophages offer a sustainable and powerful method of controlling microbes.

6 Comments

image: Organs on Demand

Organs on Demand

By | September 1, 2013

3-D printing has made inroads in the clinic, but constructing functional complex organs still faces major hurdles.

2 Comments

image: Week in Review: August 26–30

Week in Review: August 26–30

By | August 30, 2013

New model for neurodevelopment; more biotechs going public; how a virus jumped from mammals to birds; statin side effect linked to genetic variant

0 Comments

image: Lab-Grown Model Brains

Lab-Grown Model Brains

By | August 28, 2013

Three-dimensional tissues called “cerebral organoids” can model the earliest stages of brain development.

5 Comments

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