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Four products have already qualified for the regenerative medicine advanced therapy (RMAT) designation that provides extra interactions with the agency, and sooner.

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image: Blood Stem Cells Grown in the Lab

Blood Stem Cells Grown in the Lab

By | May 17, 2017

Researchers identify transcription factors and environmental conditions necessary to reprogram human and mouse cells into cells that function like hematopoietic stem cells.

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image: Synthetic Bones: A Better Bone-Marrow Transplant?

Synthetic Bones: A Better Bone-Marrow Transplant?

By | May 9, 2017

Artificial bones produce new blood cells in mice, obviating the need for irradiation to kill off resident hematopoietic stem cells in recipients.

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image: Stem Cell Trial Data Mostly Go Unpublished

Stem Cell Trial Data Mostly Go Unpublished

By | May 5, 2017

Less than half of completed stem cell studies in humans are published in peer-reviewed journals, according to an analysis of regenerative medicine trials. 

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image: Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

By | May 3, 2017

A heat block, a truck battery, and a novel RNA amplification assay make for in-the-field surveillance of the virus.

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image: Polio Vaccine Pioneer Dies

Polio Vaccine Pioneer Dies

By | May 2, 2017

Julius Youngner collaborated with Jonas Salk on the polio vaccine, and later identified interferon gamma and contributed to an equine influenza vaccine.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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image: Cell Lines Gain Cancer-Related Mutations

Cell Lines Gain Cancer-Related Mutations

By | April 27, 2017

A screen of human embryonic stem cell lines finds several that accumulated changes in the gene TP53, including aberrations commonly seen in cancer.

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Studies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus’s long-term hiding places in the body.

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