The Scientist

» stem cells, disease/medicine and culture

Most Recent

Genomic analysis of an oak tree that lived during Napoleon’s time supports the idea that plants somehow avoid the accumulation of mutations in their stem cells.

1 Comment

A study suggests that “chief” cells in the stomach act as reserve stem cells that are activated by tissue damage and may be the long-sought source of gastric cancer.

0 Comments

image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

0 Comments

The new findings, obtained from cell culture experiments, could explain the link between infection with the virus during pregnancy and infant microcephaly.

1 Comment

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

0 Comments

The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

1 Comment

image: Micronutrients, Macro Impact

Micronutrients, Macro Impact

By | June 1, 2017

At the interface of food, nutrition, and agriculture, Lindsay Allen’s research has been informing nutrition guidelines and policies around the world for decades.

1 Comment

image: Pinpointing the Culprit

Pinpointing the Culprit

By | June 1, 2017

Identifying immune cell subsets with CyTOF

0 Comments

These engineered “cells” were made from the secretions and membranes of human mesenchymal stem cells.

0 Comments

See researchers' recipe for synthetic mesenchymal stem cells, which showed cardiac regenerative potential in mice.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS