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image: Sea Star Comeback?

Sea Star Comeback?

By | May 9, 2016

Hordes of baby sea stars on the Pacific coast survived the summer and winter of 2015—promising news about populations that have been devastated by a wasting disease.

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image: With CRISPR, Modeling Disease in Mini Organs

With CRISPR, Modeling Disease in Mini Organs

By | May 6, 2016

Organoids grown from genetically edited stem cells are giving scientists a new tool to screen drugs and test treatments.

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Certain plant stem cells rarely divide, a study shows, possibly fending off an accumulation of potentially harmful genetic mutations in some species.

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image: Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes

Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes

By | May 5, 2016

Maternal antibodies engender a receptive gut environment for beneficial bacteria in newborn mice.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks. 

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: Cell Reprogramming Successes

Cell Reprogramming Successes

By | May 2, 2016

Two studies demonstrate the first direct, chemical reprogramming of mouse and human skin cells into heart muscle and neural cells.

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image: Transparency Now

Transparency Now

By | May 1, 2016

Science is messy. So lay it out, warts and all.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By and | May 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: More Than Skin Deep

More Than Skin Deep

By | May 1, 2016

Elaine Fuchs has worked on adult stem cells since before they were so named, figuring out how multipotent epidermal cells renew or turn into skin or hair follicles.

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