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image: Rats Receive Lab-Grown Esophagi

Rats Receive Lab-Grown Esophagi

By | April 16, 2014

Researchers successfully transplant engineered esophagi into living rats.

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image: Origins of Flesh-Eating Bacteria Uncovered

Origins of Flesh-Eating Bacteria Uncovered

By | April 15, 2014

Researchers construct a family tree of group A Streptococcus to trace the evolution of a “flesh-eating” strain.

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image: Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

By | April 14, 2014

Doctors implant custom-made organs, built from a tissue sample and a biodegradable scaffold, into four female patients born with underdeveloped or missing vaginas.

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image: Week in Review: April 7–11

Week in Review: April 7–11

By | April 11, 2014

Stress and telomere length in children; osmotic channel protein identified; amoeba nibbles, then kills cells; amphetamine and mental disorder risk; news from AACR

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image: Study: Coffee Cuts Cancer Risk

Study: Coffee Cuts Cancer Risk

By | April 10, 2014

Evidence presented at AACR suggests that daily coffee consumption may cut a person’s risk of developing a form of liver cancer.

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image: Amoeba Eats Cells Alive

Amoeba Eats Cells Alive

By | April 9, 2014

The intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica kills host cells by tearing pieces from them, which it then eats.

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image: Lab-Grown Muscle Self-Repairs

Lab-Grown Muscle Self-Repairs

By | April 8, 2014

Implanted into mice, lab-reared muscle made from stem cells can heal itself after an injury.  

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image: Recession Boosts STEM Enrollment

Recession Boosts STEM Enrollment

By | April 8, 2014

Undergraduate students are more likely to enroll in engineering and biology since the last economic downturn, a survey finds.

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image: Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

By | April 2, 2014

Researchers complete an atlas depicting gene expression across the developing human brain.

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image: The Right to Not Know

The Right to Not Know

By | April 2, 2014

Patients should be able to decline learning about incidental genetic findings when undergoing whole-genome screens, according to new expert recommendations.

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