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image: Inducing Pluripotency Every Time

Inducing Pluripotency Every Time

By | September 18, 2013

By removing a single gene, adult cells can be reprogrammed into a stem-like state with nearly 100 percent efficiency.

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image: Week in Review: September 9–13

Week in Review: September 9–13

By | September 13, 2013

A new type of stem cell; a parasitic ant species protects its hosts; reasons for biodiversity among tropical amphibians; transforming translational research

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image: Week in Review: September 2–6

Week in Review: September 2–6

By | September 6, 2013

More than 320,000 mammalian viruses lurk; evolution of echolocation in bats and dolphins; accumulation of mutations in drug-resistant tuberculosis; senior researchers reluctant to retire

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image: Bird, Fish, and Fly Cells Reprogrammed

Bird, Fish, and Fly Cells Reprogrammed

By | September 5, 2013

Using mouse genes, researchers partially transform differentiated, non-mammalian cells into pluripotent stem cells.

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image: Surprising Similarities in Divergent Genomes

Surprising Similarities in Divergent Genomes

By | September 4, 2013

Researchers find genome-wide evidence of convergent evolution between bats and dolphins.

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image: Decoding Drug-Resistant TB

Decoding Drug-Resistant TB

By | September 1, 2013

Researchers characterize drug-resistant tuberculosis by analyzing the genomes of more than 500 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from around the world.

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Contributors

By | September 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the September 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

Bacteriophages shuttle genes between diverse ecosystems.

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image: Printing Ears

Printing Ears

By | September 1, 2013

Cornell University biomedical engineer Lawrence Bonassar 3-D prints ears using “ink” that contains living cells.

2 Comments

image: Printing Life

Printing Life

By | September 1, 2013

3-D printing allows tissue engineers to fabricate more-complex shapes and to precisely mix biological materials.

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