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image: Unethical Stem Cells?

Unethical Stem Cells?

By | February 8, 2013

Some of the 200 or so human embryonic stem cell lines approved for federal funding may have been derived from sperm or eggs of unconsenting donors.


image: Stem Cells: Safe Haven For TB

Stem Cells: Safe Haven For TB

By | February 5, 2013

Tuberculosis bacteria find shelter from drugs and the body’s defenses in bone marrow stem cells.


image: Opinion: Health Booth 2020

Opinion: Health Booth 2020

By | February 4, 2013

Using a SMART card containing your genetic information and medical history, you could one day soon be diagnosed and treated for all kinds of diseases at an ATM-style kiosk.


image: A Chill Issue

A Chill Issue

By | February 1, 2013

The very cold, the merely chilled, and the colorful


image: Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

By | February 1, 2013

As cholera first tore through the Europe in the mid-19th century, people tried anything to prevent the deadly disease. Then science stepped in.


image: Immune to Failure

Immune to Failure

By | February 1, 2013

With dogged persistence and an unwillingness to entertain defeat, Bruce Beutler discovered a receptor that powers the innate immune response to infections—and earned his share of a Nobel Prize.


image: Catching the Cold

Catching the Cold

By | February 1, 2013

Tracking the genetic diversity and evolution of rhinoviruses can lead to a better understanding of viral evolution, the common cold, and more dangerous infections.


image: Opinion: An Explosion of Devices

Opinion: An Explosion of Devices

By | January 28, 2013

From cardiovascular problems to neurological disorders, a plethora of new medical devices are reducing the need for surgery and improving the quality and safety of healthcare.


image: Stem Cells Not Rejected

Stem Cells Not Rejected

By | January 25, 2013

Researchers uncover more evidence that reprogrammed stem cells are not attacked by the immune system, suggesting they may one day serve as effective therapies.

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image: Non-coding Mutations May Drive Cancer

Non-coding Mutations May Drive Cancer

By | January 24, 2013

The majority of human melanomas contain mutations in a gene promoter, suggesting mutations in regulatory regions may spur some cancers.



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