The Scientist

» stem cells, ecology and microbiology

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image: Ancient Moss Reincarnated

Ancient Moss Reincarnated

By | March 18, 2014

Antarctic moss beds that have been frozen for more than 1,500 years yield plants that can be brought back to life in the lab.

1 Comment

image: First STAP Report Released

First STAP Report Released

By | March 17, 2014

Questions of whether the stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency papers will be retracted linger as RIKEN makes public its initial investigation, finding no evidence of scientific misconduct.

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image: Stem Cells Remember Substrates

Stem Cells Remember Substrates

By | March 16, 2014

The stiffness of a culture substrate affects the fates of stem cells.  

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image: Call for STAP Retractions

Call for STAP Retractions

By | March 11, 2014

One of the scientists behind the stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency studies, which independent groups have had trouble reproducing, has requested that the papers be pulled from the literature.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: March 3–7

Week in Review: March 3–7

By | March 7, 2014

The gene behind a butterfly’s mimicry; the evolution of adipose fins; bacteria and bowel cancer; plants lacking plastid genomes

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image: Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

By | March 3, 2014

The development of serrated polyps depends on bacteria present in the gut, a mouse study shows.  

3 Comments

image: A Twist of Fate

A Twist of Fate

By | March 1, 2014

Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.

3 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Early Evidence

Early Evidence

By | March 1, 2014

Fossilized structures suggest that mat-forming microbes have been around for almost 3.5 billion years.

0 Comments

image: Northern Exposure

Northern Exposure

By | March 1, 2014

Researchers are using snowdrifts to artificially warm Arctic tundra during winter and finding that more carbon is released from the soil than plants can soak up from the atmosphere.

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