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» stem cells, ecology and neuroscience

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image: STAP Author Can’t Replicate Results

STAP Author Can’t Replicate Results

By | December 22, 2014

RIKEN’s Haruko Obokata fails to replicate stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency.

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image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.

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image: Brain-Machine Interface Goes Wireless

Brain-Machine Interface Goes Wireless

By | December 18, 2014

A paralyzed woman has used mind power and a robotic arm wirelessly connected to her brain to achieve the most dexterous movement yet accomplished with BMI.

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image: Reprogramming Redux

Reprogramming Redux

By | December 18, 2014

Can mechanical forces alone be manipulated to create stem-like cells?

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image: New Stem Cell State

New Stem Cell State

By | December 10, 2014

Through cellular reprogramming, researchers have produced a novel pluripotent mouse stem cell in vitro.

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image: Big Data and the Brain

Big Data and the Brain

By | December 8, 2014

Advances in imaging have inundated neuroscientists with massive amounts of information on synaptic connections, among other things. The challenge now is to understand it all.

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image: Shoring Up Golgi To Slow Alzheimer’s

Shoring Up Golgi To Slow Alzheimer’s

By | December 8, 2014

Blocking activity of a kinase in a mouse model protects Golgi in cells and reduces the build-up of amyloid β, a primary component of Alzheimer’s disease.

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image: Bat Navigation Revealed

Bat Navigation Revealed

By | December 4, 2014

As the flying mammals navigate complex environments, they make use of specialized brain cells that cooperate to build a coordinate system that works in three dimensions.

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image: Missing Brains Found

Missing Brains Found

By | December 3, 2014

About 100 human brains belonging to a university collection thought lost have turned up at another campus. 

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image: Along Came a Spider

Along Came a Spider

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers are turning to venom peptides to protect crops from their most devastating pests.

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