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» stem cells, ecology and immunology

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image: The Ecology of Fear

The Ecology of Fear

By | June 15, 2012

Grasshoppers in fear of predation die with less nitrogen in their bodies than unstressed grasshoppers, which can affect soil ecology.

2 Comments

image: Stem Cells from Corpses

Stem Cells from Corpses

By | June 15, 2012

Researchers pull viable cells from bodies that had been dead for more than 2 weeks.

1 Comment

image: The Fungus Among Us

The Fungus Among Us

By | June 11, 2012

Researchers find a slew of new fungal species inhabiting the human gut, and suggest a link to an inflammatory bowel disease.

1 Comment

image: A Greener Arctic

A Greener Arctic

By | June 11, 2012

Algal blooms are appearing under the ice in the Arctic Ocean in areas thought to receive too little light to support photosynthetic life.

0 Comments

image: Discovering Phasmids

Discovering Phasmids

By | June 9, 2012

Shortly after a rat infested supply ship ran around in Lord Howe Island off the east coast of Australia in 1918, the newly introduced mammals wiped out the island's phasmids—stick insects the size of a human hand. 

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image: Parkinson's Vax Enters Clinical Trials

Parkinson's Vax Enters Clinical Trials

By | June 7, 2012

Researchers in Vienna are starting a Phase I trial on the first ever vaccine with a potential to treat the neurodegenerative disease.

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image: Memory Tools for Plants

Memory Tools for Plants

By | June 4, 2012

How plants pass defenses to offspring through a complex molecular network

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image: Avant-Garde Science

Avant-Garde Science

By | June 1, 2012

Why naked mole-rats and experimental gene therapies remind me of groundbreaking artists.

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image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

0 Comments

image: Fish Transport Fukushima Radiation

Fish Transport Fukushima Radiation

By | May 28, 2012

Radioactive particles from the Fukushima nuclear disaster provide an unexpected way to track migratory marine species.

5 Comments

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