The Scientist

» stem cells, ecology and culture

Most Recent

image: How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

By | March 1, 2017

One author's journey through the science of his congenital amusia

1 Comment

image: Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

By | March 1, 2017

Studies of remote Amazonian villages reveal how culture influences our musical preferences.

1 Comment

image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | March 1, 2017

Music, the future of American science, and more

0 Comments

An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Mammary Trees

Image of the Day: Mammary Trees

By | February 14, 2017

Long-lived stem cells are activated by ovarian hormones to help grow mammary glands during pregnancy.

0 Comments

image: Regulators OK Clinical Trials Using Donor Stem Cells

Regulators OK Clinical Trials Using Donor Stem Cells

By | February 6, 2017

Japanese health officials approve human experiments to treat macular degeneration with a cell therapy derived from induced pluripotent stem cells.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

By | February 2, 2017

Traffic noise disrupts communication between dwarf mongooses and tree squirrels, according to a study.

0 Comments

image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

5 Comments

image: The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

By | February 1, 2017

Mummy berry disease coats blueberry leaves with sweet, sticky stains that smell like flowers, luring in passing insects to spread fungal spores.

2 Comments

image: Restoring a Native Island Habitat

Restoring a Native Island Habitat

By | January 30, 2017

Removal of non-native vegetation from an island ecosystem revives pollinator activity and, in turn, native plant growth. 

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal
    News & Opinion Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

    My “colleagues” and I at the fictitious Arthur Vandelay Urological Research Institute were surprised to find our bogus “uromycitisis” case report swiftly accepted, with only minor revisions requested.

  2. Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured
  3. Genetic Analysis Reveals the Evolutionary History of Dogs
  4. March for Science: Dispatches from Washington, DC
AAAS