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image: Week in Review, May 13–17

Week in Review, May 13–17

By | May 17, 2013

Reading pathogen epigenomes; a new stem cell; dealing with research misconduct; monkey fossils; exploratory mice grow new neurons; watching metamorphosis

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image: Ladybird Bioterrorists

Ladybird Bioterrorists

By | May 16, 2013

The Asian harlequin ladybird carries a biological weapon to wipe out competing species.

4 Comments

image: Suing Over a Nobel

Suing Over a Nobel

By | May 16, 2013

The scientist who sued the Nobel committee is now suing Nobel winner Shinya Yamanaka.

36 Comments

image: New Stem Cells on the Block

New Stem Cells on the Block

By | May 15, 2013

By reprogramming human fibroblasts into pluripotent stem cells with somatic cell nuclear transfer, scientists have come up with a viable alternative to iPSCs.

7 Comments

image: Clock Genes Linked to Depression

Clock Genes Linked to Depression

By | May 15, 2013

Patients with major depressive disorder appear to have malfunctioning circadian rhythms, which could lead researchers to new avenues for treatment.

12 Comments

image: Plants Communicate with Help of Fungi

Plants Communicate with Help of Fungi

By | May 14, 2013

Symbiotic fungi on the roots of bean plants can act as an underground signaling network, transmitting early warnings of impending aphid attacks.  

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: May 6 – 10

Week in Review: May 6 – 10

By | May 10, 2013

Telomeres and disease; Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes may fight malaria; bat tongue mops nectar; newly sequenced genomes

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image: Arctic Foxes Suffer from Seafood Diet

Arctic Foxes Suffer from Seafood Diet

By | May 9, 2013

The decline of a population of Arctic foxes isolated on a small Russian island may be due to mercury pollution from their diet of seabirds and seals.

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image: Anti-Malarial Mosquitoes?

Anti-Malarial Mosquitoes?

By | May 9, 2013

Artificially induced bacterial infections in mosquitoes could reduce the spread of malaria-causing parasites.

3 Comments

image: Fat Hormone Controls Diabetes

Fat Hormone Controls Diabetes

By | May 8, 2013

A small protein produced by fat cells appears to regulate blood sugar levels, potentially revealing a new way to treat diabetes.

2 Comments

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