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image: Not So Different

Not So Different

By | May 1, 2014

Researchers unearth little evidence to suggest modern humans are superior to their Neanderthal ancestors.

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image: Cell Transplants for Heart Questioned

Cell Transplants for Heart Questioned

By | May 1, 2014

A report reveals that using bone marrow stem cells to treat heart disease is less promising than a decade of research has let on.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2014

Madness and Memory, Promoting the Planck Club, The Carnivore Way, and The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons

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image: A Wilder Europe

A Wilder Europe

By | May 1, 2014

An organization hopes to restore natural ecological processes by reintroducing large herbivores to the continent.

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image: Where the Wild Things Were

Where the Wild Things Were

By | May 1, 2014

Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.

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image: Rebuilding Missing Muscle

Rebuilding Missing Muscle

By | April 30, 2014

An acellular matrix can help guide stem cells to injury sites and regrow muscles in both mice and humans, a study finds.

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image: Something Is Killing Asian Carp

Something Is Killing Asian Carp

By | April 29, 2014

Half a million invasive silver carp are dead in a Kentucky river, and nobody knows why.

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image: SCNT Picks Up Steam

SCNT Picks Up Steam

By | April 28, 2014

Study confirms that somatic cell nuclear transfer, an alternate method of creating patient-specific pluripotent stem cells, can be used to reprogram adult cells.

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image: Adult-to-Stem Cells

Adult-to-Stem Cells

By | April 21, 2014

An international team has created human embryonic stem cells from adult skin cells for the first time.

2 Comments

image: Rats Receive Lab-Grown Esophagi

Rats Receive Lab-Grown Esophagi

By | April 16, 2014

Researchers successfully transplant engineered esophagi into living rats.

3 Comments

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