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image: iPSCs and Cancer Risk

iPSCs and Cancer Risk

By | February 24, 2016

Reprogramming adult human cells into stem cells in vitro does not generate harmful mutations, scientists report.

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image: Insulin-Producing Mini Stomachs

Insulin-Producing Mini Stomachs

By | February 22, 2016

Scientists grow gastric organs in vitro that can restore insulin production when transplanted into mice.

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image: Stem Cells to Blame for Hair Loss?

Stem Cells to Blame for Hair Loss?

By | February 8, 2016

Two new studies point to factors in hair follicle stem cells as players in age-related hair loss.

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image: Organ Engineer Reinvestigated

Organ Engineer Reinvestigated

By | February 5, 2016

Paolo Macchiarini will again be investigated by the Karolinska Institute, which is not extending the researcher’s employment contract.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

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image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

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image: CRISPR Corrects Retinal Disease Mutation

CRISPR Corrects Retinal Disease Mutation

By | January 28, 2016

Patient-derived stem cells containing a genetic mutation leading to blindness can be successfully edited using CRISPR/Cas9, researchers show.

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image: CIRM Ups Translational Velocity

CIRM Ups Translational Velocity

By | December 21, 2015

California’s stem cell agency unveiled a 5-year plan that includes starting 50 new clinical trials.

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image: “Ghost Fibers” Help Heal Muscle Injury

“Ghost Fibers” Help Heal Muscle Injury

By | December 15, 2015

Injured muscle cells leave behind organized collagen fibers that act as scaffolding for new tissue growth.

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