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image: Lab-Grown Kidneys Work In Vivo

Lab-Grown Kidneys Work In Vivo

By | September 22, 2015

Researchers show organoids grown from human stem cells can excrete urine when implanted in rats and pigs.

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image: Tide Shifting on Embryo Gene Editing?

Tide Shifting on Embryo Gene Editing?

By | September 11, 2015

An international bioethics group says that research that involves editing genes in human embryos can be valuable, though it doesn’t approve of making “designer babies.”

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image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

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image: Chemical Cocktails Produce Neurons

Chemical Cocktails Produce Neurons

By | August 6, 2015

Two research groups have devised small-molecule recipes to directly transform fibroblasts into neurons.

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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: 1 + 1 = 1

1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.

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image: Intelligence Gathering

Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

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image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

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image: Opinion: New Models for ASDs

Opinion: New Models for ASDs

By | May 14, 2015

The study of mini “brains” in a dish, derived from patient cells, offers a novel approach for autism spectrum disorder research.

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image: New Stem Cell Identified

New Stem Cell Identified

By | May 6, 2015

Researchers isolate an easy-to-manipulate, stable, and spatially distinct pluripotent cell type.  

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