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A Rainforest Chorus

By | December 1, 2015

Researchers measure the health of Papua New Guinea’s forests by analyzing the ecological soundscape.

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Family Ties

By | December 1, 2015

There’s more to inheritance than genes.

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Jungle Field Trip

By | December 1, 2015

Travel to remote rain forests in Papua New Guinea with researchers from The Nature Conservancy who are working with native people to characterize ecosystems there using sound.

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The Regenerator

By | December 1, 2015

In his search for effective therapies for Parkinson’s disease, Lorenz Studer is uncovering pluripotency switches and clues to what makes cells age.

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Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

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image: Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

By | November 30, 2015

A study of black widow spiders suggests that the arachnids leave traces of their own genetic material and DNA from prey in their sticky webs.

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Stem Cell Biologist Dies

By | November 23, 2015

Paolo Bianco crusaded against cell therapy fraud and hype.

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Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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image: Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate

Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate

By | October 26, 2015

Given the right environment, cKit+ cells from the mouse heart can develop into new cardiac muscle, according to a study.

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image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.

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