The Scientist

» stem cells, evolution and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

By | October 12, 2016

Viruses are responsible for the majority of archaea deaths on the deep ocean floors, scientists show.

4 Comments

image: Donor Stem Cells Improve Cardiac Function

Donor Stem Cells Improve Cardiac Function

By | October 12, 2016

After a heart attack, monkeys given induced pluripotent stem cell–derived cardiomyocytes show more regeneration in the organ, but with risks.

0 Comments

image: An Evolutionary History

An Evolutionary History

By | October 1, 2016

Celebrating 30 years and a resurrection

2 Comments

image: Stem Cells Made Waves in Biology and Medicine

Stem Cells Made Waves in Biology and Medicine

By | October 1, 2016

Since their introduction to the lab, pluripotent stem cells have gone from research tool to therapeutic, but the journey has been rocky.

0 Comments

image: Thirty Years of Progress

Thirty Years of Progress

By | October 1, 2016

Since The Scientist published its first issue in October 1986, life-science research has transformed from a manual and often tedious task to a high-tech, largely automated process of unprecedented efficiency.

1 Comment

image: Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia

Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia

By | October 1, 2016

Bacteria inhabit most tissues in the human body, and genes from some of these microbes have made their way to the human genome. Could this genetic transfer contribute to diseases such as cancer?

3 Comments

image: Life Scientists Receive “Genius” Grants

Life Scientists Receive “Genius” Grants

By | September 22, 2016

Among this year’s 23 MacArthur Foundation Fellows are pioneering biologists.

0 Comments

image: How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine

How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine

By | September 21, 2016

Caffeine-producing plants use three different biochemical pathways and two different enzyme families to make the same molecule.

2 Comments

Matching the immunological characteristics of donor retinal cells to those of the recipient can reduce the chance of rejection.

0 Comments

image: Stingrays Chew Too

Stingrays Chew Too

By | September 15, 2016

Researchers observe stingrays moving their jaws to grind up prey, a behavior thought to be restricted to mammals.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Broad Wins CRISPR Patent Interference Case
    Daily News Broad Wins CRISPR Patent Interference Case

    The USPTO’s Patent Trial and Appeal Board has ruled in favor of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard retaining intellectual property rights covered by its patents for CRISPR gene-editing technology.

  2. Henrietta Lacks’s Family Seeks Compensation
  3. Can Plants Learn to Associate Stimuli with Reward?
  4. Humans Never Stopped Evolving
    Features Humans Never Stopped Evolving

    The emergence of blood abnormalities, an adult ability to digest milk, and changes in our physical appearance point to the continued evolution of the human race.

Business Birmingham