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image: Cell Re-Programmers Take the Nobel

Cell Re-Programmers Take the Nobel

By | October 8, 2012

John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka win this year’s Nobel Prize in Medicine for learning how to reboot cellular development. 

7 Comments

image: Cell Reprogramming Work Wins Nobel

Cell Reprogramming Work Wins Nobel

By | October 8, 2012

John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka jointly take home this year’s Nobel Prize in Medicine for turning back the developmental clock. 

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image: Mouse Eggs Made with Stem Cells

Mouse Eggs Made with Stem Cells

By | October 4, 2012

Researchers claim to have successfully transformed stem cells into viable mouse oocytes that produced healthy, fertile pups.

1 Comment

image: Growing New Neurons

Growing New Neurons

By | October 4, 2012

Brain cells called pericytes can be reprogrammed into neurons with just two proteins, pointing to a novel way to treat neurodegenerative disorders.

5 Comments

image: Salmonella Strain Spreads Alongside HIV

Salmonella Strain Spreads Alongside HIV

By | October 1, 2012

Researchers find that a deadly bacterial disease hitchhikes in people infected with the virus that causes AIDS to spread throughout sub-Saharan Africa.

2 Comments

image: Novel Deadly Virus

Novel Deadly Virus

By | October 1, 2012

A new rhabdovirus may be responsible for an outbreak of fatal hemorrhagic fever.

4 Comments

image: The Salinella salve Mystery

The Salinella salve Mystery

By | October 1, 2012

Salinella salve, an organism described as a single layer of cells, ciliated on both inner and outer surfaces and surrounding…

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image: (Re)Programming Director

(Re)Programming Director

By | October 1, 2012

Unwilling to accept the finality of terminal differentiation, Helen Blau has honed techniques that showcase the flexibility of cells to adopt different identities.

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image: Gone Missing, circa 1892

Gone Missing, circa 1892

By | October 1, 2012

A unique organism sighted only once, more than a century ago, could shed light on the evolution of multicellularity—if it ever actually existed.

3 Comments

image: Home Cookin’

Home Cookin’

By | October 1, 2012

Laboratory-raised populations of dung beetles reveal a mother's extragenetic influence on the physiques of her sons.

2 Comments

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