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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2016

Lab Girl, The Most Perfect Thing, Half-Earth, and Cosmosapiens

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Putting the Pee in Pluripotency

Putting the Pee in Pluripotency

By | April 1, 2016

One man’s waste is another man’s treasure trove of stem cells.

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image: How Zika Infiltrates Developing Brains

How Zika Infiltrates Developing Brains

By | March 30, 2016

Zika virus may commandeer a receptor on the surface of neural progenitor cells, scientists show.

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image: Minimal Genome Created

Minimal Genome Created

By | March 24, 2016

Scientists build a living cellular organism with a genome smaller than any known in nature.

2 Comments

image: Karolinska Lets Macchiarini Go

Karolinska Lets Macchiarini Go

By | March 24, 2016

The embattled artificial organ researcher has been dismissed over the fallout from several misconduct allegations leveled against him.

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image: Brains Before Brawn

Brains Before Brawn

By | March 16, 2016

A newly described horse-size relative of Tyrannosaurus rex may help settle the question of how massive carnivorous dinosaurs took shape throughout the eons.

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image: Less Chewing, More Doing

Less Chewing, More Doing

By | March 11, 2016

Food processing in early hominid populations might have played a key role in human evolution by increasing net energy uptake, researchers show.

3 Comments

image: CRISPRi-Controlled Gene Expression

CRISPRi-Controlled Gene Expression

By | March 10, 2016

A variation of the gene-editing technique can more precisely and efficiently downregulate the expression of target genes than traditional CRISPR/Cas9.

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image: Surgery, Stem Cells Treat Cataracts

Surgery, Stem Cells Treat Cataracts

By | March 10, 2016

A surgical technique that removes the lens but leaves endogenous stem cells to allow lens regrowth shows promise in animal and early human trials.

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