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image: Reassessing One Really Old Fish

Reassessing One Really Old Fish

By | January 13, 2015

New analysis of an ancient specimen prompts a rethink of fish forebears.

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image: The Benefits of Being a “Bearded Lady”

The Benefits of Being a “Bearded Lady”

By | January 8, 2015

A study of female eastern fence lizards that bear a distinctly male trait yields tantalizing clues about the tradeoffs involved in blurring the lines of sexual dimorphism.

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image: Stem Cell Divisions Help Explain Cancer Risk

Stem Cell Divisions Help Explain Cancer Risk

By | January 1, 2015

An analysis of 31 tissues finds that random mutations acquired during stem cell divisions correlate with lifetime cancer risk—more so than heritable mutations and environmental factors combined.  

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Performance Art

Performance Art

By | January 1, 2015

Regulation of genome expression orchestrates the behavior of insect castes and the human response to social stress.

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image: Why, Oh Y?

Why, Oh Y?

By | January 1, 2015

A toothpick and a bit of chance shaped David Page’s career, which he has dedicated to understanding the mammalian Y chromosome and fetal germ cell development.

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image: The Genetics of Society

The Genetics of Society

By | January 1, 2015

Researchers aim to unravel the molecular mechanisms by which a single genotype gives rise to diverse castes in eusocial organisms.

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image: Unraveling H7N9’s History

Unraveling H7N9’s History

By | December 30, 2014

An analysis of stored samples shows that H7N9 precursor H9N2, a virus widespread in chickens, has shown increased fitness in recent years.

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image: Toward Lab-Grown Gametes

Toward Lab-Grown Gametes

By | December 30, 2014

From stem cells, scientists generate early egg- and sperm-like cells in vitro.

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image: Contaminants Could’ve Accounted for STAP

Contaminants Could’ve Accounted for STAP

By | December 29, 2014

Embryonic stem cells likely mucked up the cultures used in the debunked “stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency” studies.

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