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» stem cells and evolution

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2012

Wired for Story, Dreamland, Homo Mysterious, and Vagina

0 Comments

image: Stemming the Toxic Tide

Stemming the Toxic Tide

By | September 1, 2012

How to screen for toxicity using stem cells

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Younger Is Better

Opinion: Younger Is Better

By | August 31, 2012

Stem cells collected from younger donors are more effective for transplantation and regenerative medicine than those from older individuals.

9 Comments

image: Creating Sperm from Skin

Creating Sperm from Skin

By | August 30, 2012

Researchers create early stage sperm cells from induced pluripotent stem cells, raising hopes that infertile men could be fathers.

0 Comments

image: Prayer Takes Precedence Over Science?

Prayer Takes Precedence Over Science?

By | August 14, 2012

A Bill of Rights amendment reaffirming the right to pray could have negative consequences for the teaching of evolution.

45 Comments

image: Gene Variation within a Tree

Gene Variation within a Tree

By | August 13, 2012

The root system of a tree species is genetically different than the leaves of that individual, potentially modifying scientists’ understanding of evolution.

8 Comments

image: New Human Species Discovered

New Human Species Discovered

By | August 9, 2012

Fossils from northern Kenya point to a new human species that lived in Africa nearly 2 million years ago.

0 Comments

image: Cancer Stem Cells Really Do Exist?

Cancer Stem Cells Really Do Exist?

By | August 1, 2012

Researchers track tumors as they develop, providing more support for the idea that cells with stem-cell-like properties underlie cancer growth and recurrence.

4 Comments

image: A Scientist Emerges

A Scientist Emerges

By | August 1, 2012

At age 16, Alexandra Sourakov has her first scientific publication, on the foraging behavior of butterflies.

3 Comments

image: Replacement Parts

Replacement Parts

By | August 1, 2012

To cope with a growing shortage of hearts, livers, and lungs suitable for transplant, some scientists are genetically engineering pigs, while others are growing organs in the lab.

16 Comments

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