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Inherited Intelligence

By | July 10, 2014

Cognitive testing in chimpanzee pedigrees reveals a genetic basis for intelligence.

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image: Week in Review: June 30–July 4

Week in Review: June 30–July 4

By | July 4, 2014

STAP retractions; comparing SCNT-derived stem cells with iPSCs; malaria-infected mice more attractive to mosquitoes; stem cell banks face business challenges

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image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

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image: Not All Stem Cells Created Equal

Not All Stem Cells Created Equal

By | July 2, 2014

Compared to induced pluripotent stem cells generated from somatic cells, stem cells created by nuclear transfer appear to be closer to the genetic state of embryonic cells.

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image: STAP Papers Retracted

STAP Papers Retracted

By | July 2, 2014

Nature issues retractions of the stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency papers and pens an editorial on the controversy surrounding their publication.

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Lichen Legion

By | July 2, 2014

Genetic analysis splits one species into 126.

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image: The Rise of Color

The Rise of Color

By | July 1, 2014

An analysis of modern birds reveals that carotenoid-based plumage coloring arose several times throughout their evolutionary history, dating as far back as 66 million years ago.

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Carnal Knowledge

By | July 1, 2014

Sex is an inherently fascinating aspect of life. As researchers learn more and more about it, surprises regularly emerge.

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Geni-Tales

By | July 1, 2014

Penises and vaginas are not just simple sperm delivery and reception organs. They have been perfected by eons of sexual conflict.  

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image: Size Matters

Size Matters

By | July 1, 2014

The disproportionately endowed carabid beetle reveals that the size of female—and not just male—genitalia influences insemination success.

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