The Scientist

» stem cells, genetics & genomics and evolution

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image: Contributors


By | November 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: The Ever-Transcendent Cell

The Ever-Transcendent Cell

By | November 1, 2014

Deriving physiologic first principles


image: Uncommonly Rare

Uncommonly Rare

By | November 1, 2014

How one of the rarest neurodegenerative diseases could lend insight into ubiquitous neuroprotective processes

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image: Walking with Whales

Walking with Whales

By | November 1, 2014

The history of cetaceans can serve as a model for both evolutionary dynamics and interdisciplinary collaboration.


image: Modeling Ebola in Mice

Modeling Ebola in Mice

By | October 30, 2014

A genetically diverse group of mice represents the complete spectrum of human outcomes from Ebola virus infection.


image: 45,000 Year-Old Bone Sequenced

45,000 Year-Old Bone Sequenced

By | October 24, 2014

The oldest human genome to have been sequenced came from a leg bone preserved in Siberia.


image: Next Generation: Freeze-Dried Gene Networks

Next Generation: Freeze-Dried Gene Networks

By | October 23, 2014

Researchers devise a way to preserve bits of paper containing synthetic gene networks, which can be easily stored and widely distributed. Rehydrated, transcription and translation “come to life.”


image: Rapid Evolution in Real Time

Rapid Evolution in Real Time

By | October 23, 2014

On islands off the coast of Florida, scientists uncover swift adaptive changes among Carolina anole populations, whose habitats were disturbed by the introduction of another lizard species.


image: Electromagnetism Promotes Pluripotency: Study

Electromagnetism Promotes Pluripotency: Study

By | October 23, 2014

A paper published last month claims that electromagnetic exposure facilitates cell reprogramming, but some scientists question the evidence.


image: Ancient Europeans Were Lactose Intolerant

Ancient Europeans Were Lactose Intolerant

By | October 21, 2014

Five-thousand years after agricultural practices spread across Neolithic Europe, human populations remained unable to digest sugars from the milk of mammals.


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