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» noncoding RNA and evolution

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image: Source of Scales, Feathers, Hair

Source of Scales, Feathers, Hair

By | June 27, 2016

Reptiles, birds, and mammals all produce tiny, bump-like structures during development.   

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image: Evolution of Fish Bioluminescence

Evolution of Fish Bioluminescence

By | June 9, 2016

Fish evolved to make their own light at least 27 times, according to a study.

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A transposon underlies this classic story of evolutionary adaptation.

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image: Finding Mislabeled Noncoding RNAs

Finding Mislabeled Noncoding RNAs

By | June 1, 2016

Researchers scour the genome for micropeptides encoded within RNAs presumed to function in a noncoding capacity.

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image: Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

By | June 1, 2016

From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.  

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image: Start Making Sense

Start Making Sense

By | June 1, 2016

Scientific progress is only achieved when humans' innate sense of understanding is validated by objective reality.

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image: Noncoding RNAs Not So Noncoding

Noncoding RNAs Not So Noncoding

By | June 1, 2016

Bits of the transcriptome once believed to function as RNA molecules are in fact translated into small proteins.

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Caltech’s Frances Arnold is honored for her work on directed evolution.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | May 17, 2016

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes  

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image: Mysterious Eukaryote Missing Mitochondria

Mysterious Eukaryote Missing Mitochondria

By | May 12, 2016

Researchers uncover the first example of a eukaryotic organism that lacks the organelles.

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