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The Scientist

» diversity, immunology and genetics & genomics

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image: Fraction of SNPs Can Affect Fitness

Fraction of SNPs Can Affect Fitness

By | January 21, 2015

A point mutation analysis of the entire human genome finds that alterations to as many as 7.5 percent of nucleotides may have contributed to humans’ evolutionary split from chimpanzees.

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image: Tracking Tuberculosis Over Time

Tracking Tuberculosis Over Time

By | January 19, 2015

Genomic analysis of a multidrug-resistant lineage pinpoints historical correlations with human events.

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image: Inflammation Overdrive

Inflammation Overdrive

By | January 15, 2015

Experimental vaccines that specifically boost T helper cells lead to immunopathology and death in mice.

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image: 23andMe Partners with Pfizer

23andMe Partners with Pfizer

By | January 13, 2015

The personal genomics company strikes yet another deal to glean biomedically relevant information from its user data.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | January 12, 2015

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Corn Chronicle

Corn Chronicle

By | January 8, 2015

A genetic analysis of ancient and modern maize clarifies the crop’s checkered domestication history.

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image: 23andMe, Genentech Partner on Parkinson’s

23andMe, Genentech Partner on Parkinson’s

By | January 7, 2015

Firms enter a multi-year deal for the analysis of whole-genome sequence data, with an eye toward drug discovery for Parkinson’s disease.

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image: Custom Creatures?

Custom Creatures?

By | January 6, 2015

San Francisco-based biotech wants to see its technology applied for inventing new organisms.

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image: Fat to the Rescue

Fat to the Rescue

By | January 5, 2015

Adipocytes under the skin help fight infections by producing an antimicrobial agent.

2 Comments

image: A Movable Defense

A Movable Defense

By | January 1, 2015

In the evolutionary arms race between pathogens and hosts, genetic elements known as transposons are regularly recruited as assault weapons for cellular defense.

4 Comments

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