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image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.

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image: NIH: $31M to Boost Workforce Diversity

NIH: $31M to Boost Workforce Diversity

By | October 24, 2014

A dozen academic research groups receive substantial National Institutes of Health funding to improve the diversity of the US biomedical community.

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image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.

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image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

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image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

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image: Diversity in Mexico

Diversity in Mexico

By | June 16, 2014

A genomic survey of Mexicans reveals a wealth of diversity in North America’s southernmost land.

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image: Ancient Apoptosis

Ancient Apoptosis

By | June 9, 2014

Humans and coral share a cell-death pathway that has been conserved between them for more than half a billion years.

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image: Immunology and Neurology Pioneer Dies

Immunology and Neurology Pioneer Dies

By | May 24, 2014

Gerald Edelman, who broke new ground in two distinct fields of life science, has passed away at age 84.

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image: Birds of a Genome

Birds of a Genome

By | May 21, 2014

Married couples have more similar DNA than random pairs of people, a study shows.

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image: Long-Distance Call

Long-Distance Call

By | May 1, 2014

Neurons may use interferon signals transmitted over great distances to fend off viral infection.

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