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image: On the Chain Gang

On the Chain Gang

By | July 1, 2012

More than simply helping haul out a cell’s garbage, ubiquitin, with its panoply of chain lengths and shapes, marks and regulates many unrelated cellular processes.

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image: Sweet Smell of Success

Sweet Smell of Success

By | July 1, 2012

With persistence and pluck, Leslie Vosshall managed to snatch insect odorant receptors from the jaws of experimental defeat.

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image: The Little Cell That Could

The Little Cell That Could

By | July 1, 2012

Critics point out that cell therapy has yet to top existing treatments. Biotech companies are setting out to change that—and prove that the technology can revolutionize medicine.

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image: Ubiquitin basics

Ubiquitin basics

By | July 1, 2012

Despite its discovery as a protein that seems to show up everywhere, at least in eukaryotic cells, researchers are only beginning to scratch the surface of all of the cellular functions involving ubiquitin. 

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image: Flower Barcodes

Flower Barcodes

By | June 28, 2012

Wales creates a database of DNA barcodes for all of its native flowering plants, hoping to guide conservation and drug development efforts.

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image: NIH Tackles Racism

NIH Tackles Racism

By | June 25, 2012

An advisory committee urges the federal funding agency to take steps to counter racial bias in the granting process.

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image: Roundup from Microbiology Meeting

Roundup from Microbiology Meeting

By | June 21, 2012

Some of the interesting stories researchers were discussing at this year’s American Society of Microbiology meeting in San Francisco.

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image: Stem Cells from Corpses

Stem Cells from Corpses

By | June 15, 2012

Researchers pull viable cells from bodies that had been dead for more than 2 weeks.

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image: Older Dads Have Healthier Kids?

Older Dads Have Healthier Kids?

By | June 11, 2012

New research finds that older men have children and grandchildren with longer telomeres, possibly pointing to health benefits of delayed reproduction.

4 Comments

Contributors

June 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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