The Scientist

» diversity and ecology

Most Recent

image: Research Behind Bars

Research Behind Bars

By | July 1, 2013

Ecologist Nalini Nadkarni advances forest conservation and science advocacy by enlisting the help of prisoners.

0 Comments

image: Science on Lockdown

Science on Lockdown

By | July 1, 2013

A forest ecologist comes down from the canopy to bring science to the masses, forming a series of improbable collaborations with prisoners.

3 Comments

image: Sea Bugs

Sea Bugs

By | July 1, 2013

Ocean viruses can impact marine ecosystems in several ways.

0 Comments

image: An Ocean of Viruses

An Ocean of Viruses

By | July 1, 2013

Viruses abound in the world’s oceans, yet researchers are only beginning to understand how they affect life and chemistry from the water’s surface to the sea floor.

3 Comments

image: Week in Review, June 10–14

Week in Review, June 10–14

By | June 14, 2013

Supreme Court says no patenting (natural) genes; brain-computer interfaces mimic motor learning in brain; regenerating finger tips; gene therapy goes deeper; NIH needs more diversity; cross-border collaboration

0 Comments

image: Opinion: The Dilemma of Diversity

Opinion: The Dilemma of Diversity

By | June 10, 2013

The NIH remains a Caucasian-dominated workforce. Why haven’t the agency’s efforts to diversify been successful?

3 Comments

image: Bird Bullies

Bird Bullies

By | June 1, 2013

Regular supplies of food for scavenger birds in Spain may not be the most effective conservation strategy, as smaller birds are bullied away.

1 Comment

image: Mary O’Connor: Warming Up

Mary O’Connor: Warming Up

By | June 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia. Age: 34

1 Comment

image: Salamander Evolution

Salamander Evolution

By | June 1, 2013

Yale University evolutionary biologist Steven Brady studies the evolutionary impacts of roads on the amphibians.

2 Comments

image: Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

By | May 23, 2013

Researchers discover a microbe living at -15°C, the coldest temperature ever reported for bacterial growth, giving hope to the search for life elsewhere in the cosmos.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How Animals and Plants Weather Hurricanes
  2. Effects of Neanderthal DNA on Modern Humans
  3. Flux and Uncertainty in the CRISPR Patent Landscape
  4. Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?
RayBiotech