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» gene therapy and microbiology

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image: Delivering New Genes

Delivering New Genes

By | June 1, 2012

Gene therapies typically involve the introduction of genetic material into target cells to replace or supplement an existing, usually dysfunctional, gene. 

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image: Interfering with Resistance

Interfering with Resistance

By | June 1, 2012

Drug efficacy and resistance mechanisms shine a light on how drugs enter cells, which could facilitate the development of new sleeping-sickness treatments. 

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image: Messing with HIV

Messing with HIV

By | June 1, 2012

Sangamo Biosciences is putting a different spin on gene therapy. 

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image: Microbiology Goes High-Tech

Microbiology Goes High-Tech

By | June 1, 2012

Out with toothpicks and pipettors; in with automation.

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image: Targeting DNA

Targeting DNA

By | June 1, 2012

After 20 years of high-profile failure, gene therapy is finally well on its way to clinical approval.

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image: Loss of Microtubule Regulator Blocks Sperm Maturation

Loss of Microtubule Regulator Blocks Sperm Maturation

By | May 24, 2012

New research suggests that controlling cytoskeletal dynamics in sperm accessory cells may help regulate male fertility.

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image: Gene Therapy for Brain Disease

Gene Therapy for Brain Disease

By | May 16, 2012

Delivering a missing enzyme to the brains of paralyzed children with a rare, life-threatening neurological disease restores movement and builds muscle mass.

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image: Bubble Vision

Bubble Vision

By | May 1, 2012

Turning a liability into an asset, cryo-electron microscopists exploit an artifact to probe protein structure.

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image: SPRead Your Antibody Capabilities

SPRead Your Antibody Capabilities

By | May 1, 2012

Using surface plasmon resonance to improve antibody detection and characterization: four case studies

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image: Ants Share Pathogens for Immunity

Ants Share Pathogens for Immunity

By | April 3, 2012

A new study shows that grooming by ants promotes colony-wide resistance to fungal infections by transferring small amounts of pathogen to nestmates.

8 Comments

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