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image: Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

By | June 16, 2013

The cell fragments play a role in the body’s first line of defense against bacterial infection, helping white blood cells grab blood-borne bacteria in the liver.

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image: Week in Review, June 10–14

Week in Review, June 10–14

By | June 14, 2013

Supreme Court says no patenting (natural) genes; brain-computer interfaces mimic motor learning in brain; regenerating finger tips; gene therapy goes deeper; NIH needs more diversity; cross-border collaboration

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image: Genes Get in Your Eye

Genes Get in Your Eye

By | June 12, 2013

Directed evolution of a gene therapy virus vector improves its penetration into the retina.

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image: Opinion: Going International

Opinion: Going International

By and | June 10, 2013

US universities need to reach across their own borders to retain global scientific preeminence.

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image: Opinion: The Dilemma of Diversity

Opinion: The Dilemma of Diversity

By | June 10, 2013

The NIH remains a Caucasian-dominated workforce. Why haven’t the agency’s efforts to diversify been successful?

3 Comments

image: Opinion: The Payoff of Big Science

Opinion: The Payoff of Big Science

By | June 3, 2013

Was the Human Genome Project the key to a gold mine?

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image: BPTW: By The Numbers

BPTW: By The Numbers

By | June 1, 2013

Take a closer look at some of the statistics generated by The Scientist's Best Place to Work Industry 2013 survey.

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image: Defending Against Plagiarism

Defending Against Plagiarism

By | June 1, 2013

Publishers need to be proactive about detecting and deterring copied text.

5 Comments

image: Making Good on Research

Making Good on Research

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing nations who engage in capacity building find it bolsters the lives of locals and their own work.

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image: Misconduct Around the Globe

Misconduct Around the Globe

By | June 1, 2013

Research misconduct is not limited to the developed world, but few countries anywhere are responding adequately.

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