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image: Delivering New Genes

Delivering New Genes

By | June 1, 2012

Gene therapies typically involve the introduction of genetic material into target cells to replace or supplement an existing, usually dysfunctional, gene. 

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image: Messing with HIV

Messing with HIV

By | June 1, 2012

Sangamo Biosciences is putting a different spin on gene therapy. 

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image: Targeting DNA

Targeting DNA

By | June 1, 2012

After 20 years of high-profile failure, gene therapy is finally well on its way to clinical approval.

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image: Fish Transport Fukushima Radiation

Fish Transport Fukushima Radiation

By | May 28, 2012

Radioactive particles from the Fukushima nuclear disaster provide an unexpected way to track migratory marine species.

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image: Food's Afterlife

Food's Afterlife

By | May 25, 2012

Meals left to mold develop colors, mycelia, and beads of digested juices, sparking the eye of an artist, and the slight concern of a mycologist.

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image: Loss of Microtubule Regulator Blocks Sperm Maturation

Loss of Microtubule Regulator Blocks Sperm Maturation

By | May 24, 2012

New research suggests that controlling cytoskeletal dynamics in sperm accessory cells may help regulate male fertility.

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image: DNA to Nab Illegal Fishers

DNA to Nab Illegal Fishers

By | May 24, 2012

A new SNP assay can determine the geographical origin of commonly overexploited fish species.

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image: Wet Weather Stymies Insects

Wet Weather Stymies Insects

By | May 21, 2012

The rainiest April in 100 years is keeping many insects from flourishing in the United Kingdom.

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image: Gene Therapy for Brain Disease

Gene Therapy for Brain Disease

By | May 16, 2012

Delivering a missing enzyme to the brains of paralyzed children with a rare, life-threatening neurological disease restores movement and builds muscle mass.

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image: How Prawns Lure Prey

How Prawns Lure Prey

By | May 15, 2012

Orange-loving Trinidad guppies are curiously attracted to orange spots on prawn pincers, which may make it easier for the predators to snatch them up.

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