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» gene therapy, evolution and ecology

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image: Unhealthy Chemicals Linked to Fracking

Unhealthy Chemicals Linked to Fracking

By | December 17, 2013

Water samples collected from natural gas extraction sites in Colorado contain hormone-disrupting chemicals linked to birth defects, infertility, and cancer.

1 Comment

image: How Bacteria Evade the Immune System

How Bacteria Evade the Immune System

By | December 12, 2013

Escherichia coli can quickly evolve to resist engulfment by macrophages, scientists have found.

4 Comments

image: A New Basal Animal

A New Basal Animal

By | December 12, 2013

Comb jellies take their place on the oldest branch of the animal family tree.  

4 Comments

image: Report: Ease Gene Therapy Reviews

Report: Ease Gene Therapy Reviews

By | December 9, 2013

The Institute of Medicine recommends relaxing the extra oversight given to gene therapy clinical trials.  

1 Comment

image: Wolfish Social Skills

Wolfish Social Skills

By | December 4, 2013

According to a new study, wolves can learn from humans.

1 Comment

image: Bipedal Beginnings

Bipedal Beginnings

By | December 4, 2013

Re-examination of a thigh bone from one of the earliest putative hominins could impact scientists’ understanding of the origins of human bipedalism, a study suggests.

0 Comments

image: Biology's Coefficient

Biology's Coefficient

By | December 1, 2013

Joel Cohen uses the tools of mathematics to deconstruct questions of life.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Accidental Species</em>

Book Excerpt from The Accidental Species

By | December 1, 2013

In Chapter 7, “The Way We Walk,” author Henry Gee describes the first steps taken by the ancestors of Homo sapiens.

0 Comments

image: Standing Up for Sex

Standing Up for Sex

By | December 1, 2013

Humans evolved the ability to walk on two legs because it allowed them to more accurately size up prospective mates. Or did they?

8 Comments

image: Waiting in the Wings

Waiting in the Wings

By | December 1, 2013

A century’s worth of collected butterflies shed light on how climate change threatens the survival of early-emerging species.

1 Comment

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Mettler Toledo
BD Biosciences
BD Biosciences