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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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image: Image of the Day: Tail Eyes

Image of the Day: Tail Eyes

By | April 3, 2017

Following treatment with a migraine drug, blind tadpoles were able to process visual information through eyes transplanted onto their tails.

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image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

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Researchers report growing a mouse embryo using two types of early stem cells.

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image: Suicide Switch for Transplanted Stem Cells

Suicide Switch for Transplanted Stem Cells

By | March 2, 2017

Researchers use an inducible gene to limit tumor growth from human iPSCs transplanted into mice.

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image: Reprogramming Hair Cells

Reprogramming Hair Cells

By | February 22, 2017

Researchers isolate stem cells from the mouse cochlea and convert them into auditory hair cells, potentially paving the way for therapies to treat hearing loss.

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image: “Waviness” Protects Nerves When Whale Mouths Stretch

“Waviness” Protects Nerves When Whale Mouths Stretch

By | February 21, 2017

Rorqual whales’ mouths can stretch to more than double their length without causing damage, thanks to two layers of neuronal coiling. 

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image: Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

By | February 17, 2017

A computer algorithm can identify the brains of autism patients with moderate accuracy based on scans taken at six months and one year of age.

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image: Cytoskeletons Direct Hydra Regeneration

Cytoskeletons Direct Hydra Regeneration

By | February 10, 2017

Although hydra are known for regenerating even under the most dire circumstances, disrupting their cytoskeletal structures can interfere with the process, scientists show.

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The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center researcher links complex traits to the genes that underlie them.

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