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image: Gut Microbes Treat Illness

Gut Microbes Treat Illness

By | July 10, 2013

Oral administration of a cocktail of bacteria derived from the human gut reduces colitis and allergy-invoked diarrhea in mice.

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image: Opinion: Research, Restricted

Opinion: Research, Restricted

By | July 8, 2013

Are the international drug laws the worst impediment to scientific inquiry since the Catholic Church banned the telescope?

4 Comments

image: Gut Microbes for Life

Gut Microbes for Life

By | July 4, 2013

Most strains of gut microbes stay with us for decades, which may prove useful for tracking our health.

6 Comments

image: The Downside of Antibiotics?

The Downside of Antibiotics?

By | July 3, 2013

Bacteria-killing antibiotics might also damage a person’s tissues.

3 Comments

image: Foot Fungus Revealed

Foot Fungus Revealed

By | July 2, 2013

A new study profiles the garden of fungal organism that grows on human feet.

1 Comment

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Innovation Nation

By | July 1, 2013

Already a world leader in high-tech entrepreneurship, Israel is now flexing its biotech muscles.

1 Comment

image: Sticking Power

Sticking Power

By | July 1, 2013

An adhesive inspired by a parasitic worm could help better affix skin grafts in burn patients.

3 Comments

image: Worm Bandage

Worm Bandage

By | July 1, 2013

Biomimicry yields a new type of patch that may help wounds heal faster.

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image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.

7 Comments

image: Worried Sick

Worried Sick

By | July 1, 2013

Expectations can make you ill. Fear can make you fragile. Understanding the nocebo effect may help prevent this painful phenomenon.

3 Comments

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