Advertisement
Salesforce
Salesforce

The Scientist

» innovation, microbiology and evolution

Most Recent

image: Our own 60 mutations

Our own 60 mutations

By | June 15, 2011

New estimates of human mutation suggest that each of us harbor approximately 60 novel genetic mutations.

4 Comments

image: Fighting to exist

Fighting to exist

By | June 14, 2011

The more closely related two species are, the more they're apt to drive one another to extinction.

24 Comments

image: Lobster-Pot Science

Lobster-Pot Science

By | June 13, 2011

Microbiologist Marvin Whiteley chats about teaming up with chemist and bioengineer Jason Shear in order to build tiny houses for bacteria.

0 Comments

image: One Hip Dino

One Hip Dino

By | June 13, 2011

University College London researcher Mike Taylor recounts the discovery of a new dinosaur with unusually powerful thigh muscles. Read the full story.

0 Comments

image: Honey bee microbiome probed

Honey bee microbiome probed

By | June 9, 2011

Researchers reveal several new viruses lurking in healthy hives.

0 Comments

image: How skunks got their stripes

How skunks got their stripes

By | June 7, 2011

The evolution of bold warning coloration in mammals.

3 Comments

image: A new cow-borne superbug

A new cow-borne superbug

By | June 7, 2011

As Germany grapples with an E. coli outbreak, a new strain of MRSA appears in Europe.

0 Comments

In Chapter 9, "We Were Hunted, Which is Why All of Us are Afraid Some of the Time and Some of Us are Afraid All of the Time," author Rob Dunn explains how predators shaped our evolution as we cowered and ran from their ravenous maws.

0 Comments

image: One-Man NIH, 1887

One-Man NIH, 1887

By | June 4, 2011

As epidemics swept across the United States in the 19th century, the US government recognized the pressing need for a national lab dedicated to the study of infectious disease. 

27 Comments

image: Arsenic-based life debate continues

Arsenic-based life debate continues

By | June 2, 2011

More than a dozen researchers voice their concerns about a 2010 paper that claims bacteria can use arsenic in place of phosphorus in its DNA and other biomolecules, such as proteins.

24 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Advertisement
NeuroScientistNews
NeuroScientistNews
Life Technologies