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image: Bipedal Beginnings

Bipedal Beginnings

By | December 4, 2013

Re-examination of a thigh bone from one of the earliest putative hominins could impact scientists’ understanding of the origins of human bipedalism, a study suggests.

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image: Stinky Cheese

Stinky Cheese

By | December 2, 2013

Researchers collaborate to create fermented food products using microbes harvested from some malodorous parts of the human body.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Accidental Species</em>

Book Excerpt from The Accidental Species

By | December 1, 2013

In Chapter 7, “The Way We Walk,” author Henry Gee describes the first steps taken by the ancestors of Homo sapiens.

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image: Mapping NYC's Microbes

Mapping NYC's Microbes

By | December 1, 2013

New York University’s Jane Carlton talks about a project designed to characterize the microbiome of the Big Apple.

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image: Metropolome

Metropolome

By | December 1, 2013

Researchers take advantage of rapid and cheap DNA sequencing technologies to map the bacterial microbiome of New York City.

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image: Organelle Architecture

Organelle Architecture

By | December 1, 2013

There’s beauty in a cell’s marriage of structure and function.

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image: Out, Damned Mycoplasma!

Out, Damned Mycoplasma!

By | December 1, 2013

Pointers for keeping your cell cultures free of mycoplasma contamination

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image: Patchy Plankton

Patchy Plankton

By | December 1, 2013

Turbulence interacts with the stabilizing efforts of motile phytoplankton to create small-scale patches of toxic, bloom-forming organisms.

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image: Standing Up for Sex

Standing Up for Sex

By | December 1, 2013

Humans evolved the ability to walk on two legs because it allowed them to more accurately size up prospective mates. Or did they?

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image: Top 10 Innovations: Honorable Mentions

Top 10 Innovations: Honorable Mentions

By | December 1, 2013

Meet some of the products that didn't break into the Top 10 in 2013, but recieved praise from our expert judges nonetheless.

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