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image: UV Light Doesn’t Fully Purify

UV Light Doesn’t Fully Purify

By | January 28, 2015

Using ultraviolet light to disinfect drinking water may simply drive bacteria to dormancy, rather than kill them.

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image: GMO “Kill Switches”

GMO “Kill Switches”

By | January 21, 2015

Scientists design bacteria reliant upon synthetic amino acids to contain genetically modified organisms.

6 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Creativity Crisis</em>

Book Excerpt from The Creativity Crisis

By | January 7, 2015

In Chapter 1, “Yin and Yang,” author Roberta B. Ness explores the dynamic tension between innovation and risk aversion in science past and present.

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image: Innovation Renovation

Innovation Renovation

By | January 1, 2015

Is the fear of funding and doing fundamental, risky research killing our ability to make breakthroughs?

3 Comments

image: Picturing Infection

Picturing Infection

By | January 1, 2015

Whole-animal, light-based imaging of infected small mammals

4 Comments

image: Measuring DNA with a Smartphone

Measuring DNA with a Smartphone

By | December 23, 2014

A new microscope attachment can allow smartphone users to take a closer look at fluorescently labeled DNA.

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image: Imagining a “World Without Microbes”

Imagining a “World Without Microbes”

By | December 18, 2014

Eradication of microbial disease likely accompanied by poor quality of life for remaining species

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image: Microbes Could Help Solve Sex Crimes

Microbes Could Help Solve Sex Crimes

By | December 17, 2014

Microbial species found in pubic hair samples could help track down criminals.

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image: Gene Jumped to All Three Domains of Life

Gene Jumped to All Three Domains of Life

By | December 1, 2014

By horizontal gene transfer, an antibacterial gene family has dispersed to a plant, an insect, several fungi, and an archaeon.

1 Comment

image: Bad Raps

Bad Raps

By | December 1, 2014

Understanding animal diseases—for their sake and for ours

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