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» innovation, immunology and microbiology

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image: Memory Tools for Plants

Memory Tools for Plants

By | June 4, 2012

How plants pass defenses to offspring through a complex molecular network

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image: Rapid Bird Flu Test

Rapid Bird Flu Test

By | June 4, 2012

New PCR assay can detect more than 40 strains of H5N1 in a single go.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | June 1, 2012

The Aha! Moment, Imagine, Ignorance, and The Age of Insight

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image: Avant-Garde Science

Avant-Garde Science

By | June 1, 2012

Why naked mole-rats and experimental gene therapies remind me of groundbreaking artists.

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image: Interfering with Resistance

Interfering with Resistance

By | June 1, 2012

Drug efficacy and resistance mechanisms shine a light on how drugs enter cells, which could facilitate the development of new sleeping-sickness treatments. 

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image: Microbiology Goes High-Tech

Microbiology Goes High-Tech

By | June 1, 2012

Out with toothpicks and pipettors; in with automation.

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image: Rural Teens Have Fewer Allergies

Rural Teens Have Fewer Allergies

By | May 8, 2012

The diversity of microbes in the great outdoors may protect against inflammatory disorders.

2 Comments

image: Pure Pursuits

Pure Pursuits

By | May 1, 2012

Techniques for simpler, cheaper, and better antibody purification

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image: Tumor Turnabout

Tumor Turnabout

By | May 1, 2012

A cytokine involved in suppressing the immune system may actually activate it to kill cancer cells.

4 Comments

image: Bubble Vision

Bubble Vision

By | May 1, 2012

Turning a liability into an asset, cryo-electron microscopists exploit an artifact to probe protein structure.

0 Comments

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