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image: Inflammation Overdrive

Inflammation Overdrive

By | January 15, 2015

Experimental vaccines that specifically boost T helper cells lead to immunopathology and death in mice.


image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Creativity Crisis</em>

Book Excerpt from The Creativity Crisis

By | January 7, 2015

In Chapter 1, “Yin and Yang,” author Roberta B. Ness explores the dynamic tension between innovation and risk aversion in science past and present.

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image: Fat to the Rescue

Fat to the Rescue

By | January 5, 2015

Adipocytes under the skin help fight infections by producing an antimicrobial agent.


image: A Movable Defense

A Movable Defense

By | January 1, 2015

In the evolutionary arms race between pathogens and hosts, genetic elements known as transposons are regularly recruited as assault weapons for cellular defense.


image: Eye on the Fly

Eye on the Fly

By | January 1, 2015

Automating Drosophila behavior screens gives researchers a break from tedious observation, and enables higher-throughput, more-quantitative experiments than ever before.


image: Innovation Renovation

Innovation Renovation

By | January 1, 2015

Is the fear of funding and doing fundamental, risky research killing our ability to make breakthroughs?


image: Micro Masterpiece

Micro Masterpiece

By | January 1, 2015

The artful science of Tom Deerinck, a micrographer who consistently places in Nikon’s Small World competition


image: Rat Race

Rat Race

By | January 1, 2015

Neuroscientist Anthony Zador explains why he uses rats to understand auditory attention in the brain.


image: Tangle Trigger

Tangle Trigger

By | January 1, 2015

An enzyme that cleaves tau protein in acidic cellular conditions may trigger early events in Alzheimer’s disease.


image: Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures

By | January 1, 2015

Social adversity shapes humans’ immune systems—and probably their susceptibility to disease—by altering the expression of large groups of genes.


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