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image: Innovation Nation

Innovation Nation

By | July 1, 2013

Already a world leader in high-tech entrepreneurship, Israel is now flexing its biotech muscles.

1 Comment

image: Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

By | July 1, 2013

Paul Ehrlich came up with an explanation for cellular interactions based on receptors, earning a Nobel Prize and the title "Father of Modern Immunology"—only to have his theory forgotten.

3 Comments

image: Sticking Power

Sticking Power

By | July 1, 2013

An adhesive inspired by a parasitic worm could help better affix skin grafts in burn patients.

3 Comments

image: Worm Bandage

Worm Bandage

By | July 1, 2013

Biomimicry yields a new type of patch that may help wounds heal faster.

0 Comments

image: Worried Sick

Worried Sick

By | July 1, 2013

Expectations can make you ill. Fear can make you fragile. Understanding the nocebo effect may help prevent this painful phenomenon.

3 Comments

image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity

0 Comments

image: Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

By | June 16, 2013

The cell fragments play a role in the body’s first line of defense against bacterial infection, helping white blood cells grab blood-borne bacteria in the liver.

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image: Genes Get in Your Eye

Genes Get in Your Eye

By | June 12, 2013

Directed evolution of a gene therapy virus vector improves its penetration into the retina.

5 Comments

image: Nailing Regeneration

Nailing Regeneration

By | June 12, 2013

Researchers identify the signaling program that enables finger and toenail stem cells to direct digit regeneration after amputation.

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image: The Solution to Medical Isotope Shortages?

The Solution to Medical Isotope Shortages?

By | June 11, 2013

A Canadian lab demonstrates upgrades to hospital cyclotrons that can yield enough diagnostic tracer element overnight to meet an entire city’s daily needs.

0 Comments

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