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image: Celebrated Neuroscientist Dies

Celebrated Neuroscientist Dies

By | September 23, 2013

Candace Pert, who helped discover opioid receptors, has passed away at age 67.

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image: The Price of DNA IDs

The Price of DNA IDs

By | September 16, 2013

Following natural disasters or violent political turmoil, DNA science can help identify victims. But what if a country can’t afford the technology?

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Submit Your Innovation

By | September 16, 2013

There's only one day left to enter a product in The Scientist’s Top 10 Innovations of 2013 competition.

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image: Opinion: Making Room for Rising Stars

Opinion: Making Room for Rising Stars

By | September 4, 2013

Dealing with the delicate matter of retirement for aging academics

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image: A New Way of Seeing

A New Way of Seeing

By | September 1, 2013

Inspiration and controversy attended the birth of magnetic resonance imaging, a diagnostic technology that changed the course of human medicine.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI</em>

Book Excerpt from Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of MRI

By | September 1, 2013

In Chapter 6, “The first fruitful weeks,” author M. Joan Dawson describes her late husband’s first steps in the invention of a revolutionary imaging technology.

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Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2013

Rocket Girl, The Cancer Chronicles, Abominable Science!, and The Sports Gene

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Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2013

September 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: Electric Fish Kin Wired Differently

Electric Fish Kin Wired Differently

By | August 29, 2013

Two new species of closely related electric fishes discovered in the Amazon produce very different electrical signals: one AC, the other DC.

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image: Lab-Grown Model Brains

Lab-Grown Model Brains

By | August 28, 2013

Three-dimensional tissues called “cerebral organoids” can model the earliest stages of brain development.

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