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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Shocked</em>

Book Excerpt from Shocked

By | August 1, 2014

In Chapter 4, “Science fiction, space travel, and the strange science of suspended animation,” author David Casarett describes his brush with adenosine monophosphate and reanimated mice.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | August 1, 2014

The Myth of Mirror Neurons, Curious, Shadow Medicine, and Doctored

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | August 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Science Speak

Science Speak

By | August 1, 2014

Contests that challenge young scientists to explain their research without jargon are turning science communication into a competitive sport.

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Speaking of Science

By | August 1, 2014

August 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Scientific Elevator Pitches

Scientific Elevator Pitches

By | August 1, 2014

A number of competitions around the world are challenging young scientists to describe their research in mere minutes.

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image: Reanimated Chickens and Zombie Dogs

Reanimated Chickens and Zombie Dogs

By | August 1, 2014

In praise of weird science at the edge of life

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image: Zebrafish Brain in Action

Zebrafish Brain in Action

By | July 28, 2014

Researchers use light-sheet microscopy to map central nervous system activity in zebrafish larvae.

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image: Books on the <em>Beagle</em>

Books on the Beagle

By | July 17, 2014

An online reconstruction makes the library from Darwin’s famed ship more accessible. 

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image: The Genetics of Friendship

The Genetics of Friendship

By | July 16, 2014

People tend to choose friends who share their genes, a study suggests.

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