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image: Gene Editing: From Roots to Riches

Gene Editing: From Roots to Riches

By | October 1, 2016

Advances in genetic manipulation have simplified the once daunting task of rewriting a gene.

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image: Microscopy’s Growth Through the Years

Microscopy’s Growth Through the Years

By | October 1, 2016

From confocal fluorescence microscopy to super-resolution and live 3-D imaging, microscopes have changed rapidly since 1986.

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image: New and Old Techniques in Modern Neuroscience

New and Old Techniques in Modern Neuroscience

By | October 1, 2016

Imaging and manipulating the brain has come a long way from electrodes and the patch clamp, though such traditional tools remain essential.

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image: Stem Cells Made Waves in Biology and Medicine

Stem Cells Made Waves in Biology and Medicine

By | October 1, 2016

Since their introduction to the lab, pluripotent stem cells have gone from research tool to therapeutic, but the journey has been rocky.

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image: Thirty Years of Progress

Thirty Years of Progress

By | October 1, 2016

Since The Scientist published its first issue in October 1986, life-science research has transformed from a manual and often tedious task to a high-tech, largely automated process of unprecedented efficiency.

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image: Does Productivity Diminish Research Quality?

Does Productivity Diminish Research Quality?

By | September 28, 2016

More papers correlate with top-cited research for more-established academics, but not newly minted professors, according to a study.  

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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image: This is Your Brain on Art

This is Your Brain on Art

By | September 1, 2016

Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel talks about how our brains perceive and understand works of art.

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In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

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