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image: Down and Dirty

Down and Dirty

By | September 1, 2012

Diverse plant communities create a disease-fighting "soil genotype."


image: Gifted in Science

Gifted in Science

By | September 1, 2012

Researchers look to the emerging phenomenon of "crowdfunding" to pay for their work

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image: Good Vibrations

Good Vibrations

By | September 1, 2012

Researchers are learning how species from across the animal kingdom use seismic signals to mate, hunt, solve territorial disputes, and much more.

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image: From Plants and Fungi to Clouds

From Plants and Fungi to Clouds

By | August 31, 2012

Salt compounds produced by plant and fungus species help form organic aerosols that form clouds and produce rain.


image: Glass Shape Speeds Drinking

Glass Shape Speeds Drinking

By | August 31, 2012

The shape of the glass holding your favorite brew can affect how quickly you get drunk.


image: Stalking Sharks

Stalking Sharks

By | August 30, 2012

Researchers monitor the movement of the Pacific’s largest predators and share the information with the world in real time.


image: Submit Your Innovations Today!

Submit Your Innovations Today!

By | August 29, 2012

You have until the end of this week (Sept. 21 @ 11:59 PM, EDT) to submit your product to The Scientist's 2012 Top 10 Innovations. Be sure to enter your innovative products!


image: Curiouser and Curiouser

Curiouser and Curiouser

By | August 23, 2012

A review of the new book Curious Behavior, which delves into the quirks of human conduct.


image: Mothers-In-Law and Menopause

Mothers-In-Law and Menopause

By | August 23, 2012

Competition for resources between mothers- and daughters-in-law having children at the same time could have been a driver for the emergence of menopause.


image: Zoo Virus Swap

Zoo Virus Swap

By | August 17, 2012

A polar bear in a German zoo dies after contracting a virus normally found in zebras.


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