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The Scientist

» innovation and developmental biology

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image: How to Make Eyeball Stew

How to Make Eyeball Stew

By | March 1, 2012

Editor's choice in developmental biology

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image: Model Citizen

Model Citizen

By | March 1, 2012

With an eye to understanding animal regeneration, Alejandro Sánchez Alvarado has turned a freshwater planarian into a model system to watch.

2 Comments

image: How Tigers Get Their Stripes

How Tigers Get Their Stripes

By | February 22, 2012

For the first time researchers have demonstrated the molecular tango that gives rise to repeating patterns in developing animal embryos.

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image: Cell Change Up

Cell Change Up

By | February 9, 2012

Imaging cell cytoskeletons during early embryonic development leads researchers to uncover a new regulator of cell shape

3 Comments

image: Iron Builds a Better Brain

Iron Builds a Better Brain

By | January 9, 2012

Brain imaging and gene analyses in twins reveal that white matter integrity is linked to an iron homeostasis gene.

9 Comments

image: Top Ten Innovations 2011

Top Ten Innovations 2011

By | January 1, 2012

Our list of the best and brightest products that 2011 had to offer the life scientist

5 Comments

image: In with the New

In with the New

By | January 1, 2012

There is definitely no shortage of technological innovation in the life sciences.

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image: Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

By | January 1, 2012

Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Western Ontario. Age: 34

3 Comments

image: 2011's Best and Brightest

2011's Best and Brightest

By | January 1, 2012

In its brief, 4-year history, The Scientist’s annual Top 10 Innovations contest has become a showcase of the coolest life science tools to emerge in the previous year. 

15 Comments

image: Astronaut Worms Return from Space

Astronaut Worms Return from Space

By | December 1, 2011

After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.

3 Comments

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