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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: Napster Cofounder Launches Cancer Initiative

Napster Cofounder Launches Cancer Initiative

By | April 13, 2016

Billionaire Silicon Valley entrepreneur Sean Parker donates $250 million to unite the cancer research community around the common goal of developing new immunotherapies.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: Who Owns CRISPR, Cont’d

Who Owns CRISPR, Cont’d

By | January 14, 2016

The US Patent and Trademark Office declares a patent “interference” and will seek to determine who has rights to the gene-editing technology.

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image: <em>The Scientist</em> on The Pulse, December 4

The Scientist on The Pulse, December 4

By | December 4, 2015

Are precision gene editing technologies, such as CRISPR, ready for prime time?

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image: Family Ties

Family Ties

By | December 1, 2015

There’s more to inheritance than genes.

3 Comments

image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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