The Scientist

» innovation and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

image: Bad Raps

Bad Raps

By | December 1, 2014

Understanding animal diseases—for their sake and for ours

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2014

Your Atomic Self, Eureka!, A Talent for Friendship, and Undeniable

0 Comments

image: Desktop Human

Desktop Human

By | December 1, 2014

Meet the researchers behind ATHENA, the project that aims to create a system of linked model human organs that may revolutionize drug development.

0 Comments

image: Homo Minutus

Homo Minutus

By | December 1, 2014

A miniature platform with multiple organ-on-a-chip constructs aims to speed up drug discovery—and create better transplants for patients.

1 Comment

image: Honorable Innovation

Honorable Innovation

By | December 1, 2014

Runners up in the Top 10 Innovations of 2014 competition

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | December 1, 2014

December 2014's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: Top 10 Innovations 2014

Top 10 Innovations 2014

By | December 1, 2014

The list of the year’s best new products contains both perennial winners and innovative newcomers.

1 Comment

image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

0 Comments

image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Humans Never Stopped Evolving
    Features Humans Never Stopped Evolving

    The emergence of blood abnormalities, an adult ability to digest milk, and changes in our physical appearance point to the continued evolution of the human race.

  2. An Aging-Related Effect on the Circadian Clock
  3. Marching for Science, from Berlin to Sydney
  4. Opinion: Is a Clone Really Born at Age Zero?
Business Birmingham