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image: Death Match

Death Match

By | October 1, 2012

Cockfighting and other cultural practices in Southeast Asia could greatly aid the spread of deadly diseases like bird flu.

1 Comment

image: Live-Action Networks

Live-Action Networks

By | October 1, 2012

Mass spec plus novel software equals dynamic views into the chemical lives of microbes.

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image: 2012 Labbies Honorable Mentions

2012 Labbies Honorable Mentions

By | October 1, 2012

Check out other memorable images and videos that were submitted to this year’s Labby Multimedia Awards.

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image: Medicines for the World

Medicines for the World

By | October 1, 2012

A global R&D treaty could boost innovation and improve the health of the world’s poor—and rich.

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image: Cystic Fibrosis Alters Microbiome?

Cystic Fibrosis Alters Microbiome?

By | September 28, 2012

The microbiome of the lung is different in patients with the disease, which causes a thick buildup of mucus that makes breathing difficult.

2 Comments

image: Next Generation: Nanowire Forest

Next Generation: Nanowire Forest

By | September 26, 2012

Researchers show that nanowire-based biosensors can collect and detect proteins in one chip.

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image: Outbreak Watch

Outbreak Watch

By | September 26, 2012

International health officials are monitoring a new respiratory virus that has killed one person and left another in critical condition.

1 Comment

image: Surviving Acidity

Surviving Acidity

By | September 25, 2012

A new study reveals clues to the naked mole-rat’s ability to thrive in underground environments with high levels of carbon dioxide.

2 Comments

image: Surprise XMRV Retraction

Surprise XMRV Retraction

By | September 21, 2012

The journal PLOS Pathogens abruptly retracts the seminal paper linking XMRV to disease.

2 Comments

image: NIH Clinic Outbreak Kills Again

NIH Clinic Outbreak Kills Again

By | September 20, 2012

A seventh patient succumbs to a deadly, drug-resistant superbug terrorizing the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center.

4 Comments

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