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image: Spot the Moth

Spot the Moth

By | May 1, 2012

It’s a well-known story: The peppered moth’s ancestral typica phenotype is white with dark speckles. 

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image: Telomere Basics

Telomere Basics

By | May 1, 2012

Telomeres are repetitive, noncoding sequences that cap the ends of linear chromosomes. They consist of hexameric nucleotide sequences (TTAGGG in humans) repeated hundreds to thousands of times. 

4 Comments

image: Burgers and Flies

Burgers and Flies

By | May 1, 2012

Inspired by Darwin, Mohamed Noor has uncovered the molecular dance by which a single species becomes two.

10 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2012

Masters of the Planet, Learning from the Octopus, Darwin’s Devices, and Psychology’s Ghosts

2 Comments

Contributors

May 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Treating Fat with Fat

Treating Fat with Fat

By | May 1, 2012

Is brown fat ready for therapeutic prime time?

22 Comments

image: Data Diving

Data Diving

By | May 1, 2012

What lies untapped beneath the surface of published clinical trial analyses could rock the world of independent review.

28 Comments

image: Freezing Time

Freezing Time

By | May 1, 2012

Targeting the briefest moment in chemistry may lead to an exceptionally strong new class of drugs.

15 Comments

image: From Squeaks to Song

From Squeaks to Song

By | May 1, 2012

House mice sing melodies out of the range of human hearing, and the crooning is impacting research from evolutionary biology to neuroscience.

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Mighty Moth Man

By | May 1, 2012

An evolutionary biologist’s posthumous publication restores the peppered moth to its iconic status as a textbook example of evolution.

11 Comments

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