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image: Unhealthy Chemicals Linked to Fracking

Unhealthy Chemicals Linked to Fracking

By | December 17, 2013

Water samples collected from natural gas extraction sites in Colorado contain hormone-disrupting chemicals linked to birth defects, infertility, and cancer.

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image: Gut Bacteria Vary with Diet

Gut Bacteria Vary with Diet

By | December 13, 2013

Extreme diets can alter the microbial makeup of the human GI tract, and change the behavior of those bacteria.

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image: Gut Microbes and Autism

Gut Microbes and Autism

By | December 9, 2013

Dosing mice modeling autism with a human gut bacterium reversed some disorder-associated behaviors in the animals.

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image: Stinky Cheese

Stinky Cheese

By | December 2, 2013

Researchers collaborate to create fermented food products using microbes harvested from some malodorous parts of the human body.

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image: Biology's Coefficient

Biology's Coefficient

By | December 1, 2013

Joel Cohen uses the tools of mathematics to deconstruct questions of life.

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image: Mapping NYC's Microbes

Mapping NYC's Microbes

By | December 1, 2013

New York University’s Jane Carlton talks about a project designed to characterize the microbiome of the Big Apple.

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image: Metropolome

Metropolome

By | December 1, 2013

Researchers take advantage of rapid and cheap DNA sequencing technologies to map the bacterial microbiome of New York City.

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image: Organelle Architecture

Organelle Architecture

By | December 1, 2013

There’s beauty in a cell’s marriage of structure and function.

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image: Out, Damned Mycoplasma!

Out, Damned Mycoplasma!

By | December 1, 2013

Pointers for keeping your cell cultures free of mycoplasma contamination

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image: Patchy Plankton

Patchy Plankton

By | December 1, 2013

Turbulence interacts with the stabilizing efforts of motile phytoplankton to create small-scale patches of toxic, bloom-forming organisms.

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