Advertisement
Cellular Research
Cellular Research

The Scientist

» innovation, ecology and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Homo Minutus

Homo Minutus

By | December 1, 2014

A miniature platform with multiple organ-on-a-chip constructs aims to speed up drug discovery—and create better transplants for patients.

1 Comment

image: Honorable Innovation

Honorable Innovation

By | December 1, 2014

Runners up in the Top 10 Innovations of 2014 competition

0 Comments

image: Microflora for Hire

Microflora for Hire

By | December 1, 2014

The guts of cows and termites harbor microbes that are renowned complex-carbohydrate digesters, but the human gastrointestinal tract has flora that just might measure up.

2 Comments

image: Polymerase Pieces

Polymerase Pieces

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers discover a new subunit of a bacterial RNA polymerase—as well as hints of its potential role in defending against viruses.

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | December 1, 2014

December 2014's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: A Race Against Extinction

A Race Against Extinction

By | December 1, 2014

Bat populations ravaged; hundreds of amphibian species driven to extinction; diverse groups of birds threatened. Taking risks will be necessary to control deadly wildlife pathogens.

3 Comments

image: Top 10 Innovations 2014

Top 10 Innovations 2014

By | December 1, 2014

The list of the year’s best new products contains both perennial winners and innovative newcomers.

1 Comment

image: Virus Protects Mouse Gut

Virus Protects Mouse Gut

By | November 19, 2014

A murine norovirus appears to recover some of the functions of commensal bacteria in the guts of germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice.

1 Comment

image: Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

By | November 19, 2014

Researchers discover a densovirus that is strongly associated with sea star wasting disease.

0 Comments

image: Sealed With a Kiss

Sealed With a Kiss

By | November 17, 2014

A single intimate smooch can transfer upwards of 80 million bacteria.

0 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Biology Research
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Panasonic
Panasonic
Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist