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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

17 Comments

image: Dolphins by Name

Dolphins by Name

By | July 23, 2013

Bottlenose dolphins can recognize and respond to their own “signature whistles,” strengthening the evidence that these whistles function like names.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Racing Toward Invention

Opinion: Racing Toward Invention

By | July 23, 2013

A newly instated patent law discriminates against academics and small biotechs.

6 Comments

image: Innovation Nation

Innovation Nation

By | July 1, 2013

Already a world leader in high-tech entrepreneurship, Israel is now flexing its biotech muscles.

1 Comment

image: Research Behind Bars

Research Behind Bars

By | July 1, 2013

Ecologist Nalini Nadkarni advances forest conservation and science advocacy by enlisting the help of prisoners.

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image: Science on Lockdown

Science on Lockdown

By | July 1, 2013

A forest ecologist comes down from the canopy to bring science to the masses, forming a series of improbable collaborations with prisoners.

3 Comments

image: Sea Bugs

Sea Bugs

By | July 1, 2013

Ocean viruses can impact marine ecosystems in several ways.

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image: Sticking Power

Sticking Power

By | July 1, 2013

An adhesive inspired by a parasitic worm could help better affix skin grafts in burn patients.

3 Comments

image: Worm Bandage

Worm Bandage

By | July 1, 2013

Biomimicry yields a new type of patch that may help wounds heal faster.

0 Comments

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